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Portrait of the Duke of Monmouth 1685c.

Studio of Willem Wissing

James, Duke of Monmouth was one of the seventeenth century’s most colourful and engaging figures. As Charles II’s eldest, though illegitimate, son Monmouth was assured a life of favour and wealth. The King treated him as his favourite, and showered him with high office and honour. But from an early age, Monmouth felt burdened by the inevitable disqualification of his illegitimacy. The frustration born out of it ultimately caused his downfall and execution in 1685.

<br />Portrait of John Evelyn (1620-1706) c. 1648</p><p>By Robert Walker </p><p>John Evelyn (1620 - 1706) He is chiefly famous for the diary which he kept for the whole of his life, from the Civil War to the reign of Queen Anne.<br />He took an active part in government, often being consulted by Charles II, and was highly regarded as an expert on both architecture and forestry. His writings also encompass the arts, politics, science and military affairs.

Portrait of John Evelyn (1620-1706) c. 1648

By Robert Walker 

 

John Evelyn (1620 – 1706) He is chiefly famous for the diary which he kept for the whole of his life, from the Civil War to the reign of Queen Anne.

He took an active part in government, often being consulted by Charles II, and was highly regarded as an expert on both architecture and forestry. His writings also encompass the arts, politics, science and military affairs.

<br /><br />Portrait of George Villiers Duke of Buckingham (1592 - 1628) 1625c.</p><br /><p>By Sir Balthesar Gerbier <br /><br />Buckingham, who was praised for his good looks and charm quickly became a favourite of James I. Under James he rose from the title of Viscount Villiers in 1617 to Earl of Buckingham before being awarded a Marquisate in the following year. When questioned about his admiration for George Villiers, the King, who referred to his favourite as his ”Sweet Steenie” and his “sweet child and wife”, is said to have responded by proclaiming, ”You may be sure that I love the Earl of Buckingham more than anyone else…Christ had his John, and I have my George”. 

Portrait of George Villiers Duke of Buckingham (1592 – 1628) 1625c.

 

By Sir Balthesar Gerbier

Buckingham, who was praised for his good looks and charm quickly became a favourite of James I. Under James he rose from the title of Viscount Villiers in 1617 to Earl of Buckingham before being awarded a Marquisate in the following year. When questioned about his admiration for George Villiers, the King, who referred to his favourite as his ”Sweet Steenie” and his “sweet child and wife”, is said to have responded by proclaiming, ”You may be sure that I love the Earl of Buckingham more than anyone else…Christ had his John, and I have my George”.

<br /><br />Portrait of Gertrude Sadleir, Lady Aston of Forfar</p><br /><p>Unknown artist, English School Early Seventeenth Century<br /><br />

Portrait of Gertrude Sadleir, Lady Aston of Forfar

Unknown artist, English School Early Seventeenth Century

<br /><br />Portrait of Lady Mary Boyle and her son Charles 1700c.</p><br /><p>Sir Godfrey Kneller Bt, Studio of 1646 - 1723</p><br /><p>This image is remarkable, and to all present researches, unique in the work of British portrait painters in the decades either side of 1700. There is no immediately comparable image of a mother suckling a child, and despite the obvious references to the Virgin Mary -a play on the sitter’s name- the painting is unmistakeably a true and tender image of motherhood.<br /><br />

Portrait of Lady Mary Boyle and her son Charles 1700c.

Sir Godfrey Kneller Bt, Studio of 1646 – 1723

This image is remarkable, and to all present researches, unique in the work of British portrait painters in the decades either side of 1700. There is no immediately comparable image of a mother suckling a child, and despite the obvious references to the Virgin Mary -a play on the sitter’s name- the painting is unmistakeably a true and tender image of motherhood.

Prince Rupert as a boy by Sir Anthony van Dyck

Prince Rupert as a boy by Sir Anthony van Dyck

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